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20130101
20130131
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Book TV 20
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CSPAN2 20
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English 20
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 12:00pm EST
experiences in israel where she's lived off and on since 2006. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. >> good afternoon, welcome. i'm the director here at the hudson institute, a son sore on islam, democracy, and the future of the islam world which publishing a journal on islamism called "current trends in islamic ideology," which i co-edit with my colleagues ambassador haqqani and eric brown. it's my pleasure to host today's event. its subject is a wonderful new book by my guest, lelya gilbert, and here it is. its title is "saturday people, sunday people: israel through the eyes of a christian so jowrner," and ms. gilbert is here to discuss her book with us. before introducing and turning to the book itself, let me say a few words by way of introduction about herself. she has had a very impressive and varied career, much of it concerned with the arts including music. she has been a song writer and worked extensively with musical groups including an african children's chorus based in uganda and based of uganda and orphans. she passed on her gifts two her two sons, colin and dylan. co
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 7:00pm EST
these publics most intensely of grievances, including grievances against the united states and israel and most importantly against their own unrepresentative pro-western government in regime. amendment the islamic republic has done is aligned itself with public opinion at south in the middle east to constrain hostile governments from attacking a. just think about how barbering largely shia population would react to the fleetest our fifth fleet based in bahrain to attack the islamic republic today. u.s. military planners could hope that the iran's population would be passive as they think they assumed maybe even five years ago. but today it clearly seems reckless. for other ridiculing many american policy elites do with the islamic republic, the appeal to regional public actually works. it works to constrain the united states and hostile, unrepresentative pro-western neighboring iran. iran is also the two reinforce these aspects of a software strategy of a number of years at picking what we would call winners, zero, hamas, hezbollah, shia groups, even the muslim brotherhood political ally and k
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 9:00am EST
their grievances against the united states and israel and, most importantly, their grievances against their own unrepresentative, pro-western governments and regimes. and then what the islamic republic has done is it has aligned itself with those publics, with public opinion itself in the middle east to constrain hostile governments from attacking it. just think about how bahrain's already-angry, largely shia population would react if we used our fifth fleet based in bahrain to attack the islamic republic today. u.s. military planners could hope that bahrain's population would be passive, as i think they assumed maybe each five years ago -- maybe even five years ago, but today that clearly seems reckless. for all the ridiculing many american policy elites do of the islamic republic, the islamic republic's appeal to regional publics actually works. it works to constrain the united states and hostile, unrepresentative, pro-western governments neighboring iran. iran has also worked to reip force these -- reinforce these aspects of it soft power strategy over a number of years by picking what we wo
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 7:30am EST
two perspectives. i look at the global forces that affect america, american jews, ma and israel, everything from the shift of power from the united states and the west to china and east, the powers of globalization in the digital era, how to deal with the 1.6 billion muslims in the world, the threats of iranian nuclear power. and i also look at internal threats, low birthrates, assimilation. and again, whether we can in effect succeed at a time when we are more successful than ever in being integrated into our society. it's a new phenomenon, and that's really what i wanted to write the book. i also write about that from an israeli perspective. i've been to israel maybe 40 times. three times this year alone. during the carter and clinton administrations i was deeply involved in policies between the u.s. and israel, but i also write from the perspective of someone who has relatives in israel, who has spent many, many years in times and israel. so it's a unique perspective, looking from the outside in and from the inside out. >> ambassador eizenstat, israel was one of a few foreign
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 1:00pm EST
of african-americans that left chicago in 1967, fled to liberia, and then eventually to southern israel, and by '69 they made it to southern israel and have been there ever since. very few people talk about this community. what was once 400 people who left are now 34 hundred, and it's a story about how the community in israel uses that as a base to connect with community members on five different continentses all over the world. there's a change of folks throughout the united states and i'm interested in how they use the media technology to build this transnational spiritual community, and it's a fascinating story that few people know about. so it would be fun to bring that to hopefully a wide audience. >> host: you're finishing it but self months before at it published. >> guest: not until the end of 2013. >> host: we have been talking with university of pennsylvania professor dr. john l. jackson, jr., here's the book. racial pair nowa, the unintended consequences of political correctness, this is book tv on c-span2. >> now from the university of pennsylvania. we discuss the new media
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 4:30pm EST
weapons, scud missile, and i was there then. he fired them at saudi arabia and israel. he had bilogical weapons and makings of a nuclear realms program, and, in fact, israel bombed a reactor and seventh back that program. he was a man who had a fairly substantial wmd arsenal much like assad has in syria today, and the task after the first gulf war was to dismantle that arsenal, and part of what led to the debate wmd of the second iraq war, the 2003 war was a lot of people in the united nations and american government were not satisfied that the weapons that he did have had been fully e eradicated and hard to prove a negative. we now know by the time the 2003 invasion occurred, this one substantial arsenal basically deteriorated into nothing or had been removed. that was not understood at the time in part because for a period of years, there was not u.n. inspections in iraq. >> host: how many times did you go over to iraq? >> guest: i'm not sure i remember exactly, but i was -- i covered the first war, the 1991 war, and i wrote a book about it called "the journal's war," and then i was t
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2013 9:05am EST
brave or suicidal, maybe some combination of the two, who dared to visit israel on a couple of different occasions and thought iraq had actually normalize relations with israel, for which sentiments he faced attempts to get him in prison, which he successfully beat, and in an iraqi court, he did not however manage to stop extremists who, in 2005, attacked him and his sons and killed his two sons in retaliation for his country and visiting israel. but he was not discouraged and he ran for parliament and you want a seat in 2005. but i remember being with him in his living room in baghdad in 2008. .. about this with emma scott, one of the great experts who was an insider during this period. we did jerry little to stop them especially in 2010 under the obama administration when they took it very hands-off attitude basically saying we are not going to get involved in the outcome of the iraqi political debate. all we care about is having free and fair elections. to my mind, that is a mistake and it's proven to be a mistake in practice, because it's allowed a essentially the elements to seize p
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2013 3:05am EST
-- a brave iraqi parliamentarian, brave or suicidal or a combination of the two, who dared to visit israel and thought iraq should normalize relations with israel for which sentiments he faced attempts to get him imprisoned, which he beat, and won rulings in his favor in an iraqi court, but he didn't stop the extremists who in 2005 attacked him and his sops and killed his two sons in retaliation for visiting israel. testifies not discouraged, ran for parliament, won a seat in 2005, but i remember meeting with him in his living room in baghdad in 2008 rueing the fact he had little money on which to run for re-election or to fund a slate of like-minded candidates whereas all the radical extremists in iraq got cope yows funds from the iranians, and the iranians called him asking if he want the $5 million, and he said, no thank you, i'm opposed to what you stand for, but very few people in iraq turn down an offer like that from whatever source. what happened in iraq is that the iranians basically had free run to assert their influence, and we did very little to stop them, especially so in 2010
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 8:00am EST
muslims, the iranians don't like the muslims -- the iranians know that israel has nuclear weapons and we have nuclear-weapons and they feel they would like to be in charge of there and destiny or player at the table i think and i have written carefully in a book about iran and i wish you would read it carefully because i think it is a very complicated subject. also -- i know is complicated. the iranians are very good negotiators. they have been negotiating for 3,000 years and our people, i feel for them but i don't know who are the negotiators, if there've to that sort of negotiation. the iranians are. it is important to understand their culture and i do think in terms of hostages it was not fully understood, i don't want to go to great length but they were not understood. two things come out of this. we should not have to interfere in other countries. we as a country should lead by example. this country has been incredible what it has done to integrate raises and countries and languages and people and we should do leadership by that. and i think also that we should listen to what the ir
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 8:00am EST
ally, anchor in the middle east, supportive of israel. tunisia was a little bit -- by that point had already kind of crossed the threshold and ben ali was out. syria, the comparisons with libya are quite, you know, it's very different. it's a multisectarian society with lots and lots of, you know, connections to other powers, notably iran, lebanon, israel where disrupting or changing that relationship could have all sorts of consequences which are unknown. so libya presented a, was unique in that the libyans had -- especially if there was a popular uprising -- there was a program that had been put forth by a small group of people who had put themselves forward as sort of first unofficial but then increasingly official spokesmen of the people. there's a prom which doesn't -- a program which doesn't exist in syria at the moment. and this was an opportunity for, essentially, for president obama and the united states to make some good on much of the content of the 2009 speech. which is very important. i think people are potentially losing sight of that. the second takeaway, i think, is t
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 12:00am EST
iraq should normalize elections with israel for which sentiments face attempts to give him presents in an iraqi court. he did not however manage to stop the extremists who have tracked his sons and killed his two sons for his retaliation for visiting israel. he ran for parliament in one of seidin 2005 but i remember meeting with him in his living room in baghdad in 2000 where he was showing the fact that he had little money to run for re-election and little money with like-minded candidates where all the radical extremists in iraq were receiving copious funds from the quds force from the iranians and he said the iranians called him up and said how would he like $5 million or a similar amount? yes said no thank you, i'm opposed to what you stand for but there were few people in iraq that would turn down a offer like that from whatever source. would happen in iraq was the iranians basically had free run to assert their influence and we did very little to stop them, especially so in 2010. i was just talking about this with them its guy who was one of the great experts in iraq in the wo
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 1:00pm EST
. i, and my research assistants, including josh israel, who is up there someplace and is going to give us some entertainment with johnson and king talking. could not possibly have gotten as far as we got in trying to unravel the story without the resources of the archives and the unfailingly courteous, bright, helpful people from the archives. and i want to personally thank them, not only in behalf of myself but in behalf of other people who work in this field. they're just great. the idea of this book was sort of a gamble. it was a hunch. i wondered -- there have been lots of books written about king. lots of books written about johnson. there's been lots of books written about civil rights. but no one had taken johnson and king together, put them under a microscope, and watched what they did day-by-day through an incredible period of history. a two-year period, from kennedy's assassination, to the passage of the voting rights act, when numerous of our most distinguished historians say, more legislation of huge impact on our society took place in that brief period than any other perio
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 11:00pm EST
are saying he said israel will be no more. he did not say annihilated. there is so much i do think they will have to understand the culture that i wish that you agree but to understand other people's culture. >> of the last few minutes if you like to ask raise your hand. >> speenine. [inaudible] >> guest: i wrote a lot in the '80s and i had files i had papers all over the house. that that is where it came from. i had a good memory but what i had done but i follow iran and various things spinet the story almost told itself. i just did the typing that it was clear to me that 68 was a pivotal year because of the moment in time in history and one of the interesting things of her life is how she lived through this time and new people like richard nixon that her perspective is one that i don't think i have ever seen a man have it is a woman's perspective because she responded to the way he treated his wife. that is what memoir can contribute because women do have a slightly different experience. another question? >> speenine. [inaudible] [inaudible] >> guest: i like to tell stories in or
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 8:30pm EST
with israel, or the deployment of military forces for purposes of national security. the americans have been there for 150 years giving to the region in much more practical and beneficial ways for the people of the region, and not just for us. that's why i wrote the book. i wanted them to know that, and i wanted the american people to know that story. >> host: who was malcolm, and what what happened to him? >> guest: a professor of science at ucla who left the year before i arrived to work on my ph.d.. he grew up in beirut. his patients were on the faculty at aub, and though he made a very distinguished career for himself in the united states as a score lar of the middle east, he went home in the early 80s to lead the school during a period of particularly difficult times when beirut fractured due to the civil war and the israeli incursion of 1892, the city a mess, the school under assault, in a lot of personal danger, but he believed that going back and running the school and providing an example of leadership at a time of crisis was the best thing to do for the institution that he loved, a
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 5:00pm EST
in general. certainly adversarial to nationstate struggling such as israel. we think in terms of categories of liberal internationalism, realism, but we haven't thought of global politics, which is now transnational. american lawyers are going to international courts to try to indict american airmen. that's transnational politics. we need a rethinking of world politics. we have a hostile player. there's many american trans nationalists and they see america to lead the way, to sort of a doubt the global governance project and have america share sovereignty. so sharing sovereignty with others and demonstrate leadership. how? subordinated themselves to supranational legal machine. america's got to a globally. it really means following global leadership. but those who promote americans and global governance say this is in our interest and it's consistent with their values. it's in our interest because with the strongest power in china and nations are coming out. so what we want to do is establish global rules now so 30 years from now or so these rules will be in place, chinese elites and others
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 1:30pm EST
, in israel, in europe, in the baa baa -- bahamas, and, oh, a friend, and writers would not let it go. i'm reading this stuff, trying to track down every rumor, every story, and, you know, the credible witnesses include al capone's piano tuner who gives an interview in which he says he was tuning the piano when al and kennedy met together. they were -- they include the ex-wife of a chicago mobster who says, yeah, yeah, my husband was a good friend of joe kennedy. they included people who came out of the wood work to talk to me, including someone in a penitentiary in canada who insisted that his grand uncle had been killed by kennedy who was in partnership with truman as a bootlegger. [laughter] you know, how did bootlegging -- where did they get the booze? none of it made sense. it was one credible piece of data, one credible, and that was that a -- the canadian government was great during this whole thing. they didn't give a damn. they supported as much booze as possible coming across the border as long as the shippers paid an excise tax before they slipped it into the united states. jo
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 11:00pm EST
that he fired. i was also over there when he fired them at saudi arabia and israel he had biological weapons, and at one point he had the makings of a nuclear weapon acquired its of the gulf war. he was a man that had a fairly substantial wmd arsenal much like the shaara al-assad has in syria today. and that task after the first gulf war was to dismantle the arsenal, and a part of what led to the debate over the wmd for the second iraq war was a lot of people in the united nations and in the american government were not satisfied that the weapons that he did have had been fully eradicate it, and was hard to prove, but we now know that by the time the 2003 occasion occurred this had deteriorated into nothing more had been removed and that isn't understood that time in part because for a period of news and inspections iraq. >> host: how many times did you go over to iraq? >> guest: i'm not sure that i can remember exactly, but i covered the first 1991 war called the general war and then i was there for the invasion in 2003 and actually got to baghdad on april 12th and the place was in
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 8:45am EST
the national threat institute. i'm on the advisory board. the national institute israel is in the world that pushes forward -- they invented, or we invented the return to the traditional neighborhood as alternative to suburban sprawl but they also greater a planning to become a design method which brought back and elevated to the highest possible level the involvement, the participation of citizens in the planning process. it is based here in your city is the group that works frankly internationally to share this technique. you have a real resource right here that you may not know about that's fantastic. now, what i'm going to do tonight is, because i'm sure you'll find my reading ripping because the book is a fascinating, but reading them get old so i have a short reading and then i have a slightly longer reading. i'll start with a short reading which introduces the book. i'll talk a little bit, and then i will do a slightly longer reading, and then i have a rant. we will see how that goes. i'll make sure there is time for questions as well. so, let's begin. and i should say i just fin
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)